Thursday, September 18, 2014

(Source: veronicasmars)

capnromanoff:

consider this: 

thor is always running into little kids who are thrilled to meet him - he doesn’t really understand the concept of signing autographs, but he starts carrying asgardian toys around in his pockets to give to kids he meets (much to shield’s chagrin - how are we supposed to keep alien tech under control when the god of thunder is giving out magnetic propulsion toys to five-year-olds?) 

but one day, he meets this girl who’s nine, maybe ten, and she runs up to him all misty-eyed and immediately asks him if he knows jane foster

and her mother’s embarrassed because “honey, that’s thor, aren’t you excited to see thor?” but the girl just explains that she wants to be a scientist when she grows up, and that jane foster is the astrophysicist (she pronounces the word carefully, as if she’s been practicing) who found out how the rainbow bridge worked - isn’t that so cool? she read about it in kids discover and they watched a documentary in school and dr. foster was in it and it made her think that maybe because she likes planets so much she could be a scientist, too 

and thor smiles broadly and tells her that wanting to be a scientist is a noble dream, and he says “if your mother would be willing, i could introduce you” 

and that’s how jane foster ends up with a tiny science geek in pigtails trailing around behind her in her lab, asking how everything works. jane can’t really comprehend the fact that a kid would want to meet her, but she likes explaining things and she looks at this girl and can’t help seeing herself. thor is just fucking delighted because to him the idea of jane being a child’s hero makes perfect sense, why wouldn’t it? she’s jane

and years later the girl grows up to be an astrophysicist or an astronaut or an aerospace engineer and she never forgets the time that dr. jane foster knelt down beside her and said, don’t let anybody stop you from chasing the stars, if that’s what you want 

jane foster inspiring girls in science, y/y 

largecoin:

wocinsolidarity:

fuckallies:

On average, you have a 1 in 18,989 chance of being murdered

A trans person has a 1 in 12 chance of being murdered

The average life span of a cis person is about 75-90 

The average life expectancy of a trans person is 23-30 years old

75% of people killed in anti LGBT hate crimes are poc

Think about this the next time you go crying over “cisphobia” and “reverse racism”

MESSAGE 

i think about this post like, daily

(Source: fuckoffallies)

I could talk about the PE teacher in my town who was asked to resign due to his harassment of female students, who was then hired as a school bus driver for a rural route with both primary and high school students. I could talk about how, from the age of seven, I refused to wear skirts or dresses, and from the time I entered high school at 10 to when I moved at 16 I always wore bike shorts or CCC shorts under my dress, because he was not particularly subtle about the way he looked at us – and those bus steps are high. I could talk about how this was common knowledge and was never denied by any authority figure we ever raised it with, but rather we were just kind of brushed off. I could talk about how, sometimes, I was the last person on my bus in the afternoon and I was never quite sure if something bad would happen to me, even though for a long time I probably couldn’t have articulated what it was that I feared.

I could talk about how I spent ten years of my childhood believing it was perfectly normal and acceptable for a seven year old child to stop wearing her favourite clothes because a grown man she relies on to get to and from school from a relatively remote location gets a thrill from looking up her skirt.

I could talk about the art teacher at my high school who used to run his hands up and down our backs, right along the spot where your bra sits. Considering most of us were fairly new to wearing bras in the first place, this was a decidedly uncomfortable experience. I could talk about how he used to get just a little too close for comfort in the supply room. Nothing overt, nothing nameable – just enough to make you drag someone else along with you if you needed a fresh piece of paper or you ran out of ink. I could talk about how the odd comment or complaint that was made was completely handwaved, that we were told to be very careful about what we were saying, that we could get someone in a lot of trouble by “starting those kinds of rumours”, and did we really want to be responsible for that?

I could talk about the first time I was made to feel ashamed of my body, at twelve or thirteen, getting into a water fight with my stepfather and uncle in the height of summer. I could talk about my grandmother completely flipping out, talking about how disgusting it was, how grown men should be ashamed of the way they were behaving with a girl. I could talk about how she then spent the next few hours trying to convince me I was being somehow victimised, while I was mostly confused about what had taken place – it took me a long time to work it out. I could talk about the unvoiced but ever-present fear for months afterwards that my grandma would bring it up again, that she would bring it up in the wrong place or to the wrong people and that my uncle, a schoolteacher, would suffer for it.

I could talk about how that destroyed what had been a fantastic relationship with my uncle, and how, ten years later, he still won’t hug me at Christmas.

I could talk about being called a frigid bitch and a slut in the same breath in high school. I could talk about multiple instances of sitting in a big group of friends, hearing someone trying to get into someone else’s pants, starting off sweet enough but quickly descending into emotional manipulation and thinly veiled abuse. I could talk about the time I went off with someone willingly enough and being followed by someone I considered a friend, someone who would not leave no matter how many times I said “no”, who only went away when the person I was with said that he “didn’t feel like sharing”.

I could talk about the family friend who always made me feel a little bit off for no discernible reason. The one who if I was left alone in the room with him, I would always find an excuse to leave. The one time I expressed this, I was told I was being a drama queen, and that I needed to grow up and stop being so precious, that one day I was going to have to deal with people I didn’t like and I might as well get used to it. I could talk about how he never did anything untoward, never gave me any specific reason to feel unsafe – but years after I last saw him, when he was found guilty of four historical sexual assault charges, one of rape and three of indecent assault on girls under twelve, I was, for reasons I still don’t entirely understand, completely unsurprised.

I could talk about my boyfriend justifying his rape of me with “you could have fought me off if you really wanted you, you slut”. I could talk about how, when I tried to tell people, I was told I was being a nasty, spiteful, vindictive bitch. I could talk about how selfish it was of me to say such things, that he’d overcome such a hard life and was going to go on and make something of himself, who the hell was I to try and stand in his way?

I could talk about how my response to being raped was to sleep with anyone and everyone because I rationalised that if I never said no, then no one could force me. I could talk about how I have been told time and time again, by people who should know better, that this is a sign that I wasn’t really raped at all.

I could talk about how, when I finally worked up the courage to make a formal complaint of sexual harassment against my boss, I was asked why I had let it continue for so long, and what I had done to make him think his behaviour would be welcomed.

I could talk about how when a much later boss got me completely wasted at my leaving party, to the point where I couldn’t walk, and fucked me in a back alley, he waited until I was sober the next morning to tell me that he had a pregnant wife, because he heard through the grapevine that I was very strict about not sleeping with married people or straight women, and he thought I should “learn my place” and realise that I’m “not such a high and mighty bitch with a moral high ground after all”.

I could talk about these things, but I very rarely do. Since I was seven years old, I have been told that my body is not my own, that my consent is not my own, that my feelings of discomfort are not my own. I have taught myself to suppress my gut instinct upon meeting people. I have been taught to smile, to be polite, to suck it up if I feel unsafe. When I complain, I have been told I’m being irrational, oversensitive, and selfish. The underlying message is, how dare I try and ascertain any kind of control over my own body?

I should talk about it. But I don’t actually know whether I can.

An anonymous guest post on The Lady Garden. This is the reality for so many women. #YesAllWomen (via takealookatyourlife)

(Source: youtastelike-sunlight)

-since when does an avenger flinch away from a scrap?
-ms. bishop, you’re not—
-technically an avenger, fine. a young avenger, whatever.

(Source: happyjackpalmer)

cute-pubes:

transphobia is not feminism

cute-pubes:

transphobia is not feminism

Why doesn’t Medicaid cover abortion? How do you pay for it?

plannedparenthood:

image

Someone asked us:

how do you pay for an abortion? why won’t medicaid cover it?

Those are very good questions – ones that a lot of people are curious about.

For those of you who don’t know, Medicaid is government-funded insurance for low-income people. There’s federal funding for Medicaid and also state funding for Medicaid.

The Hyde Amendment prohibits the federal government from paying for abortion except in cases of rape, incest, or if the pregnant person’s life is in danger.

However, the Hyde Amendment doesn’t keep states from using their own Medicaid money to cover abortion. Right now, 17 states use their own state funds to cover abortion for those who have insurance through Medicaid.  

When it comes to private health insurance, it depends on the plan. Some cover abortion and some don’t. So the best thing to do is to call your Medicaid or private insurance office and the health center where you’re getting your procedure to find out if your abortion will covered and how much it will cost.

If your insurance won’t cover your abortion, or if you don’t have health insurance, your local Planned Parenthood health center may be able to help. Many health centers can work out a payment plan with you. Some even provide services on a sliding scale (meaning the lower your income, the less you pay).

You can also check out the Abortion Access Fund, which provides funding for abortions for those who cannot afford them.

Learn more about the Hyde Amendment and Medicaid laws in your state.

-Chelsea @ Planned Parenthood

Wednesday, September 17, 2014
whitepeoplestealingculture:

humansofcolor:

nativefaces:

CULTURAL GENOCIDE:  Before and After photo of a young Cree boy, forced to attend a Canadian “Indian school.” (1910)

Despicable.

I want to show this to white people who say that cultural appropriation isn’t a big deal because you’re taking a part of someone’s culture that was insulted, attacked and taken away from them for years and years and now you want to wear it as some sort of costume or fashion trend. But your ancestors were the ones to forcefully take away and obliterate OUR cultures for centuries. We STILL aren’t allowed to freely embrace our cultures because white people love to insult us and make fun of us, but white people themselves love wearing it because they think their mayo asses are entitlted to everything. Nope fuck off. 

whitepeoplestealingculture:

humansofcolor:

nativefaces:

CULTURAL GENOCIDE:  Before and After photo of a young Cree boy, forced to attend a Canadian “Indian school.” (1910)

Despicable.

I want to show this to white people who say that cultural appropriation isn’t a big deal because you’re taking a part of someone’s culture that was insulted, attacked and taken away from them for years and years and now you want to wear it as some sort of costume or fashion trend. But your ancestors were the ones to forcefully take away and obliterate OUR cultures for centuries. We STILL aren’t allowed to freely embrace our cultures because white people love to insult us and make fun of us, but white people themselves love wearing it because they think their mayo asses are entitlted to everything. Nope fuck off. 

patrocluz:

MYTHOLOGY MEME(2/2) Mythological Objects

According to Greek mythology, Ariadne was willing to help Theseus find his way out of the Labyrinth. In exchange Theseus promised to marry her and take her back to Athens. Ariadne gave him a BALL OF THREAD and told him to secure one end at the entrance to the Labyrinth. He could then unravel the ball as he made his way. By following the thread Theseus would be able to find the way back to the entrance.

Theseus slowly made his way through the Labyrinth, unravelling the ball as he went. He encountered the Minotaur, and after a struggle slew the beast. Together with the others he followed the thread back to the entrance and out of the Labyrinth.

duskenpath:

oli-via:

duskenpath:

Rest stops on highways are liminal spaces where the veil is thin and nobody can tell me differently

Explain

The explanation is that liminal spaces are in between places that bridge Here with There, so in fairy tales we often have the Fairy Ring, the Forest Clearing, the Sudden Misty Foggy Forest, the Bridge, the River, graveyards, in some cases

We also have a ton of american urban mythology around famous roadways and sites off the sides of roads

Archetypes like these occur to mark the places in the world where the veil goes thin and humans can have extra-worldly experiences, out of the ordinary way of living

So why wouldn’t transient spaces like rest stops where everyone is just passing through from one place to the next, never stopping for too long, not be a liminal space where spirits frequent, too

Especially since nobody would know if they were real or not

socialjusticekoolaid:

Protesters from across St Louis turned up and turned out for the first St Louis County Council Meeting since Mike Brown’s Death. (Part II)

The St Louis County Council meeting was a fiery afar, as residents from across the county demanded Darren Wilson’s arrest, answers for Mike Brown’s death, and expressed frustration at their own police force being turned on them like they were enemies of the state. #staywoke #farfromover

pencilpaperpassion:

marauders4evr:

Wow, so I cannot draw.

That’s alright though. I’m more of a writer. And I have a story to tell.

I have always been disabled. However, up until eight years ago, I could still walk, run, skip, jump, etc. In November 2006, I had a surgery that left me almost paralyzed. I could walk short distances but had to spend the rest of my time in a wheelchair. I was scared and confused. I didn’t know what to do. One day, I turned on the small television in my hospital room and realized that there was an Avatar marathon on. Now, you must understand. I’ve watched Avatar since I was in the fourth grade – when the very first episode came out! So I sat back and eagerly watched the marathon, whispering the dialogue and humming along to the music. When The Northern Air Temple came on, I sat in stunned silence. I had forgotten all about Teo! Here was an epic, well-written, character who just so happened to be disabled! Even better, he was a character who didn’t let his disability define him! By the time I reached The Blind Bandit, I was grinning from ear-to-ear as I watched Toph take down the group of wrestlers.

Toph and Teo are two of the best characters with disabilities that I’ve ever seen. Both are shown to have their limitations. Nevertheless, they’re both mentally, emotionally, and physically strong! And most importantly, they overcome their limitations! Teo can still fly around with the rest of his friends and is able to protect his home when the time comes. Toph is still able to travel around with the Avatar and has proven herself to be an excellent fighter and the greatest earthbender in the world!

To me, it was as if these fictional characters were saying, “You can do this! Don’t listen to anyone who says otherwise. What do they know!?”

And eight years later, it seem that the tables have turned.

A large part of the Avatar fandom seems to be taking the news that Korra’s in a wheelchair very badly. I’ve seen so many depressing and nasty comments. Many people are wondering how the Avatar can still fight and keep balance while being in a wheelchair.

And every time I see someone comment about how Korra “can’t do this” I just smile and think, “Yes, she can.”

this brought tears to my eyes

nanodash:

This is Alexandrite, it’s also called “emerald by day, ruby by night”
It changes colour based on whether the light source is from the sun or from a candle.
It does this because Alexandrite strongly absorbs yellow light due to chromium ions in its crystal structure, leaving the other colours behind. Light from the Sun emits all colours, but it peaks in the green, and our eyes are most sensitive to green, so in Sunlight Alexandrite is green.
Incandescent lights are things like candles and filament light bulbs. They also emit all colours of light, but they peak far, far into the red, so there’s not nearly as much green or blue, so under those, Alexandrite is red. 
Gemstones are awesome.

nanodash:

This is Alexandrite, it’s also called “emerald by day, ruby by night”

It changes colour based on whether the light source is from the sun or from a candle.

It does this because Alexandrite strongly absorbs yellow light due to chromium ions in its crystal structure, leaving the other colours behind. Light from the Sun emits all colours, but it peaks in the green, and our eyes are most sensitive to green, so in Sunlight Alexandrite is green.

Incandescent lights are things like candles and filament light bulbs. They also emit all colours of light, but they peak far, far into the red, so there’s not nearly as much green or blue, so under those, Alexandrite is red. 

Gemstones are awesome.