Saturday, April 19, 2014
braiker:

Are you fucking kidding me? Did we all just wake up in 1938?

braiker:

Are you fucking kidding me? Did we all just wake up in 1938?

Friday, April 18, 2014

5centsapound:

Zanele Muholi: Of Love & Loss (2014) - Currently showing at Stevenson Gallery in Johannesberg (South Africa) from 14 February - 4 April 2014.

The opening coincides with the presentation of a prestigious Prince Claus Award to Muholi.

Gallery Statement:

In times of increasingly homophobic legislation enacted by African countries and in a climate of intolerance towards homosexuals in the Western world, South Africa distinguishes itself with a Constitution that recognises same-sex marriages; yet the black LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex) community is plagued by hate crimes. Black lesbians are particularly vulnerable and are regularly victims of brutal murders and ‘curatives rapes’ at the hand of neighbours or ‘friends’.

Since 2013 Muholi has been documenting weddings and funerals in the black LGBTI community in South Africa, joyful and painful events that often seem to go hand in hand. The show features photographs, video works and an installation highlighting how manifestations of sorrow and celebration bear similarities and are occasions to underline the need for a safe space to express individual identities.

As Muholi writes:

Ayanda Magoloza and Nhlanhla Moremi’s wedding in Katlehong took place four months after Duduzile Zozo was murdered in Thokoza. Promise Meyer and Gift Sammone’s wedding in Daveyton took place on 22 December in Daveyton, 15 days after Maleshwane Radebe was buried in Ratanda. Six months earlier, Ziningi and Delisile Ndlela were married in Chesterville, Durban. Many in the area attended the ceremony, blessed the newlywed couple and prayed for them and their children. We long for such blessings as we continue to read about the trials and tribulations that LGBTI persons experience in their churches, where homosexuality is persecuted. In 2014, when South African democracy celebrates its 20 years, it seems more important than ever to raise again our voice against hate crimes and discriminations made towards the LGBTI community.

The exhibition includes also a series of autobiographical images, intimate portraits of Muholi and her partner taken during their travels, a tender counterpoint to the tension still generated in South Africa today by same-sex and interracial relationships.

see her past work here.

Thursday, April 17, 2014
Wednesday, April 16, 2014

fefe-hake:

poly—nesian:

tiare-tipani:


While Australians face enormous challenges from climate change, put yourself in the shoes of those living on coral islands and atolls spread across the Pacific Ocean. For Pacific Islanders, land is life. Climate change is threatening this. It threatens families and the viability of islander communities and culture. The Pacific Island states of Tuvalu and Kiribati, situated north-east of Australia, and about half-way to Hawaii, are low-lying island nations experiencing some of the earliest and worst impacts of climate change.

"In the event that the situation is not reversed, where does the international community think the Tuvalu people are to hide from the onslaught of sea level rise? Taking us as environmental refugees, is not what Tuvalu is after in the long run.

We want the islands of Tuvalu and our nation to remain permanently and not be submerged as a result of greed and uncontrolled consumption of industrialized countries.

We want our children to grow up the way my wife and I did in our own islands and in our own culture.

Climate change is happening. The scientific consensus is that human activity is warming the Earth. This is changing weather patterns, increasing the frequency and intensity of severe weather events such as droughts, floods and cyclones and causing sea level rise – all of which impact on the ability of people in Kiribati and Tuvalu to find shelter, food and clean drinking water.

as my aunty said the other day, it’s not only your house that goes when it floods but it’s also your entire community, your language, your tikanga, your culture, and everything else you could imagine. these things are near impossible to bring back once they’re gone.

Tuesday, April 15, 2014
jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. 

Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. 

Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. 

Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”

After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” 

As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”

In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. 

Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. 

To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/

To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/

For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281

To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229

And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

dudewithabow:

"So, er, for the non South Asians in the audience who perhaps didn’t understand why there was applause, the British built a really extensive railway system throughout India before they left, and it wasn’t so much for transportation for the Indian people, it was because it’s really hard to plunder on foot."

Hari Kondabolu’s joke about the British colonisation of India [x]

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

thatdangerous:

the-real-t-nasty:

-teesa-:

3.24.14

omfg 

The news is a bag of dicks.

Monday, March 24, 2014

tohdaryl:

cuphaz:

cuphaz:

I feel like nobody on Tumblr cares about what happened in Taiwan because we are a small, small country.

Even though I’ve been acting chilled and keeping on my blogging stuffs, I still feel a little bit sad and worried that everyone on Tumblr only knows things happening in big countries. I’ve talked about this on my blog only a few times but nobody really pays attention to what I said. Maybe because I don’t have enough followers, maybe because media doesn’t have enough reports about this thing, maybe because nobody has died in this event so people don’t consider it serious. 

You guys probably think governments which are being harsh to their people are scary, but recently I realized governments which ignore their people are scary too. My country, Taiwan, is trying to pass a Cross-Strait Service Trade Agreement with Mainland China. The problem is not about this agreement, the problem is that our people have no idea how this agreement work, who is in charge with this agreement and how many professional estimation has been done before the agreement gets signed. We are afraid, because if this agreement has some problems, our economy might collapse and thousands people might lose their jobs and their families. This agreement is too sloppy to be signed. Our people tried to express our worry but the government didn’t give a shit.

So on March 17th, hundreds of college students broke into the Legislature and occupied the building. It has been 6 days since those students are inside the building. They have no resources and everything is in bad condition. The building is surrounded by bunches of police officers. Even though the government promised they wouldn’t attack those students, we have no idea what would happen if those students keep on occupying the building. The leader of the students, Lin and Chen, declare that their purpose is to fight for everyone’s right in a peaceful way. They want the government to accept their 2 simple requests: disapprove the agreement and make a new law making sure the agreement would be deliberated in a reasonable procedure. But after 6 days, the government still doesn’t pay attention to them and resist all their requests. Our president, Mr. Ma, also refuses to meet the students leaders to listen to their demands. Students inside and outside the Legislature have been irritated by the government’s attitude. The situation has gone wild and there are even some violence stuffs happened despite how hard the leaders are trying to handle all over 30 thousands angry students.

I just want more people to know about this. My government doesn’t listen to their people’s voice. We are angry and hopeless. Most of these people are under 25, they are just a group of college students who don’t want to watch their own country being treated unfairly. They have no bids to fight with our government. They have been constantly fighting for 6 days. Their parents can’t even go into the building to meet their beloved children. They are exhausted and frustrated but they still don’t want to give up. You think college students only know partying and skipping classes? No. These young adults are fighting for their won country like real warriors. I don’t understand why nobody cares about their actions. They are brave and strong and they are probably just in your age. They need more attention. Even though you probably can’t do anything for them, but your attention might help them keep going on. And your attention might help them to make our government fear. Government needs to be feared by their people.

PLEASE READ THIS AND REBLOG. Things have been out of control last night. Students and people got beaten up by police. I couldn’t stop crying when I watched the news. There were bloods everywhere and the police were even trying to get the media away so they wouldn’t get to record the violence scene…we really need attention. WE NEED MORE PEOPLE TO KNOW WHAT HAPPENED! These students are still young and innocent. They just want to protest for the future of the country but they probably not gonna even meet their families anymore. We’ve got enough coldness from our government. PLEASE DO NOT IGNORE US.

Hey Tumblr, listen up! Spread this around, do what we can to help those in need for their voices to be heard out there. We’ve done it for Ukraine and Venezuela, and even Australia, when governments turn against their own people with brutality and violence. Let’s do it again! 

Signal boost this muthafucka. 

Saturday, March 22, 2014
new-aesthetic:

Twitter / utku: “Twitter is blocked in Turkey. On the streets of Istanbul, the action against censorship is graffiti DNS addresses.”

new-aesthetic:

Twitter / utku: “Twitter is blocked in Turkey. On the streets of Istanbul, the action against censorship is graffiti DNS addresses.”

Friday, March 21, 2014

songofages:

jackwidowss:

itsajensenthing:

letgobreathein:

deathvoices:

jurassicjames:

Tony Abbott Questioned by Newtown High Students
[x]

The fact that a group of year 9 students can blunder the countries PM is pretty telling.

Tony abbot from living under his own ears

Female Student: “Why are you so against legalizing gay marriage?”
Abbott: “I’m all for people having loving permanent relationships”
Female Student: “Becaise I have a lot of friends who are gay and it’s sad to think they can never get married just because they’re attracted to the same sex.”
Abbott: “I see where this is going. Can we have a blokes question?” 

"Why do you think following in Howard’s footsteps and turning back asylum seekers is a good idea?"
Abbott: “Do you know how many boat people drowned last year-“
"Too many!" 

Abbott: “I’ll allow one more question”
Student: “Do you know it’s a human right to seek aslyum in another county?”
Abbott: [laughs] “That’s the same question as before. Another question!”

Just wanna say all these students cheered their peers when they asked these questions, and Abbott had nothing to say. 

These kids were, what, 16? And yet I’d trust them running my country more than this dibshit. 

#actually year 9’s are 14 or 15#so even more of a point#he got fucking slayed by a bunch of 14 year olds

Let’s have a blokes question…LETS HAVE A FUCKING BLOKES QUESTION!? No matter how many times you say you aren’t sexist, it’s little gems like this that prove you are.

Tuesday, March 18, 2014
reuters:

A Palestinian youth throws a stone towards Israeli soldiers as he jumps over burning tyres during clashes that followed a rally to support President Mahmoud Abbas in the West Bank city of Hebron March 17, 2014. Thousands of Palestinians took to the streets on Monday to show their support for Abbas, who is under heavy pressure as he prepares to meet U.S. President Barack Obama. REUTERS/Mussa Qawasma

reuters:

A Palestinian youth throws a stone towards Israeli soldiers as he jumps over burning tyres during clashes that followed a rally to support President Mahmoud Abbas in the West Bank city of Hebron March 17, 2014. Thousands of Palestinians took to the streets on Monday to show their support for Abbas, who is under heavy pressure as he prepares to meet U.S. President Barack Obama. REUTERS/Mussa Qawasma

Monday, March 17, 2014 Saturday, March 8, 2014

soyonscruels:

i swear to god if i see ONE MORE programme about the london economic boom~~~~ without some acknowledgement of the following:

  1. that more than a quarter of londoners live in poverty. hackney is the most deprived borough in england. tower hamlets has the worst child poverty, with more than half of children who live there in poverty, and the london boroughs of islington, westminster, camden, and, again, hackney, all make the top ten. there are londoners living on slum houseboats without heating or water in order to make rent. homelessness has increased by 13%. (and it increased a staggering 43% the preceeding year.) rents are twice the national average. more than 60% of teachers have personally fed children in their classes who would not have eaten otherwise. we are increasingly re-creating a london that would not seem unfamiliar to henry mayhew. does this scare anyone? am i scaring you yet?
  2. that nobody is asking the right questions. who is benefiting from this economic boom, as clearly it is not 25-30% of londoners, at the very least? where is the money coming from? who does it belong to? how can you call something a boom when thousands of children in the same city can’t afford three meals a day? does that sound accurate to you? does that sound right?
  3. that, yeah, london jumps the queue. some of london. the bitterness felt about london, especially in the most northern english cities and in scotland and wales is palpable, and, frankly, pretty justified. if you want to make programmes about the north/south divide, why don’t you make them in the north? why are they always filmed in the south? why don’t they ever have any real depth to them? if you want to talk about the north/south divide, why haven’t you tried talking to any actual northerners?

—then i am gonna cut a bitch.

Friday, March 7, 2014
gokuma:

aljazeeraamerica:

Uganda hit with foreign aid cuts over anti-gay law

Uganda’s government has been hit with substantial aid cuts after the President Yoweri Museveni enacted a severe anti-gay measure earlier this week.
At least three European countries announced the withdrawal of millions of dollars in direct support to Uganda’s government, which depends on donors for about 20 percent of its budget.
The Dutch government said in a statement Thursday that it is suspending aid to Uganda’s government but will continue supporting non-governmental groups, joining the governments of Norway and Denmark in taking such action.
Norway is withdrawing at least $8 million but will increase its support to human rights and democracy defenders, while Denmark is restructuring aid programs worth $8.64 million away from the Ugandan government and over to private actors and civic groups.

Read more
(Photo: Rebecca Vassie/AP)

I wonder what the U.S. is gonna do…

gokuma:

aljazeeraamerica:

Uganda hit with foreign aid cuts over anti-gay law

Uganda’s government has been hit with substantial aid cuts after the President Yoweri Museveni enacted a severe anti-gay measure earlier this week.

At least three European countries announced the withdrawal of millions of dollars in direct support to Uganda’s government, which depends on donors for about 20 percent of its budget.

The Dutch government said in a statement Thursday that it is suspending aid to Uganda’s government but will continue supporting non-governmental groups, joining the governments of Norway and Denmark in taking such action.

Norway is withdrawing at least $8 million but will increase its support to human rights and democracy defenders, while Denmark is restructuring aid programs worth $8.64 million away from the Ugandan government and over to private actors and civic groups.

Read more

(Photo: Rebecca Vassie/AP)

I wonder what the U.S. is gonna do…